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Showing posts from November, 2019

Reflections on Burnout

Since my "Balancing Time" blog post, I have not gotten my life together better. Rather, I believe I have been spiraling down an even steeper hole in trying to do even more things at once. To put simply, these past months have been one of the most exhaustive but eye-opening months of my life, and I wish to reflect on it now that I have a little time.  The biggest paradigm shift I have had is in my view towards academia, as something not as prioritized in my life as self-development, extracurriculars, or finding a career path. Excelling in school has always been one of my biggest pride points, something I always had control of and something that never worried my parents (unlike my Counter-Strike addiction). This semester I've struggled much more than any semester before even with arguably more interesting classes, although I have done a good job keeping my cool despite exam outcomes. However, I don't want to forget the words of my friend Nathan - don't mistake &qu…

Inside Phil Knight's Memoir: Shoe Dog

Phil Knight wrote Shoe Dog after he retired to provide a glimpse into the difficulty of starting a company as prominent as Nike. 
His memoir is captivating because it provides minute details about moments that proved to be incredibly pivotal in the success of Nike, yet he also captures his struggles alongside his successes. If anything was to be taken as a lesson from the book it would be that making correct decisions when you don't know the answers is the real trait that CEOs of successful companies have. 
The story can be split into three specific parts: the startup phase, gaining traction, and post-IPO. 
During the startup phase it was apparent that Phil Knight had the tenacity and resources to enter the shoe industry because of his father's connections and his own in Bill Bowerman. One of the most unique aspects of Phil's life is the way he handled relationships with various people. He had an odd relationship with his father because he didn't believe that 'res…